FOODIE SELF PORTRAIT

What’s needed?
Leftover cupboard foods – cereals, pasta, rice, lentils, dried beans – you name it.
Large sheet of white card.
Children’s glue.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Draw a large circle onto a sheet of white card. Pour the selection of foods into small bowls. Get sticking – dried apple rings do work well as eyes!

Foodie learning:
Creativity, concentration, independence. Ask them to name the cupboard foods and the portrait – it could be of them or you!

CLAY FOOD MODELLING

What’s needed?
Clay.
Tray.
Children’s glue.
Children’s knife.
Food to copy (such as carrot, leek or sweetcorn).

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Cut the clay into hand sized pieces. Ask the children to mould the clay into the shape of the food. Using the knife they can then in add the details of the food – so the lumps and bumps of the vegetables.

Foodie learning:
Creativity, concentration, independence, fine motor skills.

WHAT AM I GAME

What’s needed?
An unusual fruit/vegetable/food.
Googly eyes to characterise.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Place the food somewhere fun for children to see – in the fridge when it’s opened or on top or the kitchen table or a cupboard if it’s not perishable. Ask them to give it a name and guess what it is. This can go on for several days! …

Foodie learning:
Imagination, learning food names.

GOING ON A FOOD HUNT

What’s needed?
A sac/bag.
A selection of unusual foods – coconut, mango, pomegranate, Sharon fruit, sweet potato, swede. Foods with some colour are easier for small children to find.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Ask the children to close their eyes. Hide the foods as they count to 20. This can be done at home in the house, garden or a woodland.
Ask the children to find the foods using hot and cold as indicators. As you find the foods ask the children to name them, then go on to discuss a bit about each food.

Foodie learning:
Fuelling their imaginations, food naming skills. They can also feel the foods and describe how they feel – so with the coconut – very hairy!

At the end the foods can be washed, cut up and served on a platter.

SPAGHETTI PAINTING

What’s needed?
Spaghetti pasta.
Different coloured paints.
Large sheet of white paper.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
This one is so easy do to. Simple break some spaghetti into half, put it on a plate with a few blobs of paint and let them explore using it on the paper.

Foodie learning:
Creativity, concentration, fine motor skills – encourage a pincer grip hold.

PASTA TRINKETS

What’s needed?
Pasta – any with a hole in it (Penne, Rotelle, Calamarata and Ditalini all work well).
Threading laces, thick wool or string.
Beads if you have them.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Tape the string down to a table.
Let your child thread the pasta and beads as they wish. Knotting the string both sides can stop the beads and pasta moving about. The end product – necklaces and friendship bangles with a difference!

Foodie learning:
Threading skills, hand-eye coordination. Say the colour and names of the types of the pasta being used.

HERB GAME

What’s needed?
A selection of herbs – basil, mint, sage, tarragon, thyme and parsley.
A chopping board.
Blindfold (not compulsory).

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Lay the herbs out on the chopping board with their name below each. Ask the children to smell each of the herbs and name them. Do this several times. Then ask them to close their eyes, smell the herb, put it back and see if they can identify which herb it was. It can be fun to use blindfolds for this one.

Foodie learning:
Sensory and memory skills, building imaginations. Introduction to naming herbs.

FOOD PRINTING

What’s needed?
Oranges, grapefruits or onions (see what’s looking weary in the fridge).
Coloured paint.
White paper/card.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Choose a food to print and coloured paint. Simply slice in half, dip in paint and stamp it. These works of art look great hung up in the kitchen.

Foodie learning:
Say the foods name – orange, grapefruit, red or white onion. Discuss the shapes and textures of the prints – round, layered, smooth, bumpy.

REAL POTATO HEAD

What’s needed?
A medium/large white potato.
Carrots cut into large round slices for feet.
Some felt cut up into shapes for hats, lips, moustaches.
Two cocktails sticks.
Children’s glue.
Googly eyes.

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?
Piece the carrot onto the bottom of each carrot and then into the potato for feet. You may wish to cut the sharp ends off the cocktail sticks and help them with this part. Let them glue and stick the felt and google eyes on to create real potato heads.

Foodie learning:
Creativity, concentration, independence. Ask them to name their potato head. This can also be done with other foods such as butternut squash.

FLOWERY BRUSSELS

What’s needed?

Brussel sprouts.
Coloured paint.
White paper/card.
Felt tip pens..

What age foodie? 2-3 years up.

What do we do?

Cut a couple of Brussel sprout in half. You will also need to draw a vase or some grass at the bottom of the page and some stems for the flowers grow out of. The children can then dip their sprouts into the paints and stamp away.

A great activity to do over the Winter and Christmas season when Brussels are in their prime!

Foodie learning:
Creativity, concentration, independence. Ask them to name their potato head. This can also be done with other foods such as butternut squash.